A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America

A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America

For two hundred years, the constitutionality of capital punishment had been axiomatic. But in 1962, Justice Arthur Goldberg and his clerk Alan Dershowitz dared to suggest otherwise, launching an underfunded band of civil rights attorneys on a quixotic crusade. In 1972, in a most unlikely victory, the Supreme Court struck down Georgia's death penalty law in Furman v. Georgi For two hundred years, the constitutionality of capital punishment had been axiomatic. But in 1962, Justice Arthur Goldbe...

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Title:A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America
Author:Evan Mandery
Rating:
Genres:Law
ISBN:0393348962
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:544 pages pages

A Wild Justice: The Death and Resurrection of Capital Punishment in America Reviews

  • Chris
    Sep 30, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

  • David
    Aug 30, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

  • Jason
    Jun 08, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Dan
    Oct 13, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Mikaela
    Jun 15, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

  • Bap
    Oct 24, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

  • Matt
    May 03, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

  • Dan
    Feb 18, 2015

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Qwalyne
    Oct 03, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

  • Sydney
    Jun 21, 2016

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

  • Jerusalem Demsas
    Feb 26, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

  • Julie
    Sep 08, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

  • Tara
    Dec 25, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Al Menaster
    Jan 19, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

  • Tim
    Sep 22, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

  • Dennis
    Jan 08, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Geillis Shadow
    Feb 20, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

  • Joe Latessa
    Oct 02, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

  • Brian Crime
    Jan 04, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

  • Aaron
    Jan 29, 2016

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Nicki
    Sep 25, 2013

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

  • Pam Wilkins
    May 25, 2015

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

  • Cassie
    May 15, 2014

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Danielle
    Jun 24, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

  • Jen
    Jan 12, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

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  • Rachel S.
    Jan 15, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

  • Ashley
    Nov 28, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

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  • Paul Bruene
    Aug 19, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

  • Georgie
    Oct 29, 2017

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

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  • Amelia
    Apr 28, 2019

    My first job out of law school was as a clerk for a state court of general jurisdiction. In the legal world, a law clerk is usually a younger attorney, fresh out of law school, who ? for some inverted reason ? gives advice and counsel to a judge with far greater experience. In that...

    When I was in law school, I read in passing that the Supreme Court struck down the death penalty in the mid 1970's, but then reintroduced it just a few years later. I recall thinking, "Something must have happened." I didn't investigate further at the time, and yet the question always ...

    Phenomenal book on the Supreme Court, which brings the personal relationships to light. I did not know whether to feel inspired as it showed how human the Justices were, or depressed, as they used legal arguments to justify their personal decisions. The more I read about the Supreme Co...

    A dense read that delved into the histories and experiences that shaped the key stakeholders (justices, litigators, researchers) in coming to their positions on capital punishment. A fascinating look into how law comes closely into play with social, political, sociological, racial, and...

    A truly impactful narrative of the litigation leading up to Furman, the decision itself, and the conditions of the years between that and Gregg. Remarkably readable. ...

    This is a fascinating, well-written account of the most pivotal years in Supreme Court death penalty jurisprudence. Mandery reveals the significant stakes of the questions under review, which stretch far beyond the narrow policy issue of whether capital punishment is "good or bad." To ...

    long but worth it. humanizing. ...

    This is a riveting story of a few short years when the Supreme Court came close to declaring the death penalty unconstitutional but the decision by a sharply divided court in Fuhrman that held that the Georgia statute rendered verdicts of death to be wanton and freakish and thus arbitr...

    I only recommend this book to people who are very interested in the death penalty because the author nearly goes into every historical detail about it, especially when it comes to the background of the two cases being discussed. ...

    I am really interested in this topic and I heard the author on the radio. He had some provocative points, so I picked up the book. While the author knows his stuff, I got bored. The first few pages seemed quite promising. But after a while there were too many names, too many cases. Man...

    I thoroughly found this book fascinating, but I was interested in death penalty law before I started this book. I especially found fascinating the interactions between the justices and their law clerks. As a law clerk myself, I found that many of their concerns mirror my own. Even thou...

    Meticulously researched, well written and reads as compellingly as fiction. Although the outcome is known, I couldn't help but hope for a different ending. (My only issue with this book was the lack of fine-tune editing. It seems that with advanced technology, there should be fewer typ...

    I very much enjoyed this book. I'm quite familiar with the case--I teach in this area--but I still learned a great deal about the internal dynamics at the court, etc. Justice Stewart wasn't really primarily concerned with arbitrariness, for example? Nice, informed read. Must've been su...

    Fabulous book. Mandery interviewed many clerks and had access to lots of internal memos and notes from the Justices, and he tells the story of the death penalty in the US; struck down then revived. ...

    It was detailed. I enjoyed the framework built around the fight to preserve our right as a nation to murder select inmates. Abolition is long overdue. ...

    I'm embarrassed by how much I didn't know about the death penalty before reading this book. ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...

    ...