Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life

Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life

The long-awaited follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Getting Things Done. David Allen?s Getting Things Done hit a nerve and ignited a movement with businesses, students, soccer moms, and techies all the way from Silicon Valley to Europe and Asia. Now, David Allen leads the world on a new path to achieve focus, control, and perspective. Throw out everything you know a The long-awaited follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Getting Things Done. David Allen?s Getting Things ...

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Title:Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life
Author:David Allen
Rating:
Genres:Productivity
ISBN:Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:286 pages pages

Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life Reviews

  • Ryan
    Apr 02, 2019

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

    David Allen makes some valid points in his followup to his quintessential productivity hit Getting Things Done, which I've read twice. I swear by this method. However, the first ten chapters of Making It All Work are repeats of GTD but with less specificity. While I agree with his asse...

    This was a great read even the second or third time around. It helped me realize what I need to focus on to get my life re-organized and find ways to continue to move my life forward, no matter what chaos the universe may through my way. And does it like to!!! I also feel this would st...

    This book was published in 2008 - halfway through the first and second edition of GTD. It is a good book, but not better than the second edition of GTD, and certainly necessary to read. I found the second edition covers more ground - and is more "future proof" than this book. I was ...

    Great follow-up to Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. This was the perfect time for me to pick up this book, as I had implemented GTD for a number of years and I was in need of a refresher/more advanced solution to keep the system running. This book introduced...

    Books about productivity and the practice of meditation have merged in my mind in a strange way. I think I'm trying to answer the question -- how can I exist in this world as a father, husband, worker, person, etc, etc, which I find to be incredibly complex, and do it with some grace a...

  • Rebecca
    Feb 19, 2009

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

  • Rukshana
    Mar 23, 2009

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

  • Alissa Thorne
    Jan 06, 2011

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

  • Gregory
    Jul 17, 2010

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

  • Ron
    Mar 08, 2009

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

  • Cathleen
    Jan 23, 2011

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

  • loafingcactus
    Jan 01, 2010

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

  • Thadeus
    Aug 05, 2013

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

  • Jay
    Feb 17, 2016

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

  • Joe Devon
    Jan 15, 2018

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

  • Andy
    Nov 04, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

  • Jeff Yoak
    Sep 17, 2009

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

  • Rina
    Feb 25, 2019

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

    David Allen makes some valid points in his followup to his quintessential productivity hit Getting Things Done, which I've read twice. I swear by this method. However, the first ten chapters of Making It All Work are repeats of GTD but with less specificity. While I agree with his asse...

    This was a great read even the second or third time around. It helped me realize what I need to focus on to get my life re-organized and find ways to continue to move my life forward, no matter what chaos the universe may through my way. And does it like to!!! I also feel this would st...

    This book was published in 2008 - halfway through the first and second edition of GTD. It is a good book, but not better than the second edition of GTD, and certainly necessary to read. I found the second edition covers more ground - and is more "future proof" than this book. I was ...

    Great follow-up to Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. This was the perfect time for me to pick up this book, as I had implemented GTD for a number of years and I was in need of a refresher/more advanced solution to keep the system running. This book introduced...

  • Derek Neighbors
    Nov 27, 2009

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

  • Abhi Yerra
    Sep 10, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

  • Alain Burrese
    Sep 25, 2012

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

  • Jaqui
    Jun 24, 2013

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

  • Shawn Camp
    Apr 18, 2012

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

  • Mike Gibbs
    Sep 16, 2011

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

  • Daniel Dent
    Mar 16, 2015

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

  • Sherry Elswick
    Jan 19, 2018

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

    David Allen makes some valid points in his followup to his quintessential productivity hit Getting Things Done, which I've read twice. I swear by this method. However, the first ten chapters of Making It All Work are repeats of GTD but with less specificity. While I agree with his asse...

  • Andrew
    May 29, 2014

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

  • Christopher Okolo
    Jul 21, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

  • Deanna
    Jan 05, 2015

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

  • Erica
    Oct 20, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

    David Allen makes some valid points in his followup to his quintessential productivity hit Getting Things Done, which I've read twice. I swear by this method. However, the first ten chapters of Making It All Work are repeats of GTD but with less specificity. While I agree with his asse...

    This was a great read even the second or third time around. It helped me realize what I need to focus on to get my life re-organized and find ways to continue to move my life forward, no matter what chaos the universe may through my way. And does it like to!!! I also feel this would st...

  • Scott
    Feb 16, 2019

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

  • Vanessa Princessa
    Jul 21, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

  • Holger Matthies
    Mar 03, 2019

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...

    So the basic is that write what you think on paper and organise your self. simple ...

    "Making It All Work: Winning At The Game Of Work And The Business Of Life" by David Allen is a follow up and companion book to his widely popular "Getting Things Done." If you have read the first book, and want a little extra on the same principles, with some further guidance in them, ...

    I read and enjoyed Getting Things Done a few years ago, and implemented his system in my own way, unsuccessful in the end, but knowing. This is like a brand extension of his first book, adding a bit where things were not made clear in the original, and repeating some of the basics. Sor...

    Making It All Work is a great sequel to Getting Things Done The Art of Stress-Free Productivity. GTD really changed my life and helped me to get control of the things that I'm doing. This book came along just in time to help me broaden my scope of attention and planning just when havin...

    This book went beyond the productivity and organizational system introduced in GTD, and focused on the higher levels of life management. It covered many of the things that I had big question marks around at the end of GTD--what about responsibilities, long term goals? How do I make sur...

    I really liked the first chapter or two of this book and the chapters on perspective toward the end. He expands on the different levels of perspective in this book, something that was lacking somewhat in Getting Things Done. The appendices were really helpful as well - good to have som...

    Fantastic discussion about how accomplishing your tasks and keeping your life organized is the REAL secret to work/life balance. We all know that feeling of being "in the zone" and that's the sort of feeling that David Allen wants people to experience as often as possible (he uses the ...

    This book digs a little deeper into the principles Allen laid out in Getting Things Done, spending a bit more time on each of the steps in his process for dealing with what's on your mind, and on the varying levels of perspective we have on our life, from fundamental principles to that...

    Making It All Work by David Allen, author of the influential productivity book Getting Things Done, is a study of the underlying philosophy of the ?GTD? productivity system that is his brain child. Making It All Work does cover a full review of the GTD system, so you can read th...

    Now I've read Getting Things Done and implemented the GTD process. I though this book would help explain some things I may have not focused entirely on and help me reach the mind like water stage. Not only did it explain those areas, it helped me focus on every area I was weak in...

    Update: I?ll take this one out of the reread cycle. It lacks any additional insight for me beyond the other two books, and it?s the longest. This time around felt like plain rehash rather than good reminders or fresh inspiration. This one's 3.5 for me but I include it when I re...

    Ehhh. I like David Allen's system, but this book was hard to get through. It tended to be redundant and wordy. He could have edited the book to highlight and explain his core principles and have added additional strategies. It would have been a more productive use of time to reread Get...

    Really good content, but a lot of rehashing from original GTD. If you haven't read GTD in a while or are on a GTD kick this is great supplemental material. It is pretty dry so unless it's a topic you are really interested in you will have a hard time getting through it. ...

    My productive advice for the day is to read Getting Things Done and call it done. There's nothing really wrong with the book, it just isn't necessary. ...

    I read this book thanks to Blinkist. And it actually heightened my fucking stress levels. I listened to his first book yesterday, which was complicated enough. This book not only repeated some of the things from the first book, but it added extra information, which was even more con...

    David Allen makes some valid points in his followup to his quintessential productivity hit Getting Things Done, which I've read twice. I swear by this method. However, the first ten chapters of Making It All Work are repeats of GTD but with less specificity. While I agree with his asse...

    This was a great read even the second or third time around. It helped me realize what I need to focus on to get my life re-organized and find ways to continue to move my life forward, no matter what chaos the universe may through my way. And does it like to!!! I also feel this would st...

    This book was published in 2008 - halfway through the first and second edition of GTD. It is a good book, but not better than the second edition of GTD, and certainly necessary to read. I found the second edition covers more ground - and is more "future proof" than this book. I was ...

  • Mike Mann
    Dec 08, 2017

    Let me start out by saying I loved Mr. Allen's first book "Getting Thing's Done" and have put the practices in to place, have sent employees to his seminar and have generally been a cheerleader. This book falls flat. This is what it felt like Mr. Allen was saying to me. 1. You D...

    This is billed as a sequel to Allen's Getting Things Done, and as a sequel, it may disappoint those who've already read the first book cover-to-cover, and are desperate for new material. However, as a revision of the original GTD system, it's exactly what I was looking for. Getting Thi...

    Listening to this again after a number of years, I realize that David Allen's advice has been very valuable. For example, a "next action" at the end of every meeting has made me and those I work with qualitatively more effective. This seems obvious now, but I had not seen it modeled in...

    This book feels influenced by critics of Getting Things Done. Much of it feels like he's saying, "yes this is common sense, yes it could be simplified, yes it could be more complicated, etc BUT." So parts are essay about those BUT's to critics. This book does not stand on its own. You ...

    It was alright. It's a sequel. Add a few things. Repeat a few things. Make a few more bucks on GTD. Overall GTD changed my life, in the sense that I'm much more organized. This wasn't a mind blowing addition but a good one. Start with GTD first though. ...

    This book is truly the book I needed at this time. Having accumulated more and more responsibilities and areas of focus in my career over the last three years, I have found it difficult to ?keep up? with all the things that need to be done. I have heard of GTD before, but haven?t...

    I strongly recommend this book if you read the first and have been working at applying GTD for a year or more. I first tried to read this about a year after I had read the first GTD book, and put it down in disappointment. I was caught up in the fussiness of realising GTD through softw...

    For those who have read and/or familiar with Allen's Getting Things Done, this is a great follow-up. If you like Allen's strategies for organization and general productivity, but occasionally find yourself "falling off the wagon," this book will help. The book elucidates the major m...

    Marking It All Work is a continuation of the GTD work that Allen has done continuing on the theme of how to make life and work more productive. I am not a strict adherent to GTD but maybe do 60% of the tasks that Allen recommends and even just doing that has been great to focus me into...

    Good information and relevant anecdotes. A good way to revisit the principles and philosophy behind Getting Things Done in greater depth. Some other reviewers feel this is unnecessary, that the original GTD book has everything you need, and it should be easy to decide for yourself whic...