A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety

A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety

?Hall lived long enough to leave behind two final books, memento mori titled ?Essays After Eighty? (2014) and now ?A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety.? They?re up there with the best things he did.? ?Dwight Garner,  New York Times From the former poet laureate of the United States, essays from the vantage point of very old age Donald Hall lived a remarkable life of ?Hall lived long enough to leave behind two final books, memento mori titled ?Essays Afte...

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Title:A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety
Author:Donald Hall
Rating:
Genres:Writing
ISBN:1328826341
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:224 pages pages

A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety Reviews

  • Ken
    Feb 17, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

  • Rick
    Aug 27, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

  • Lesley
    Jun 24, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

  • Tanya
    Jun 22, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

  • Kathleen
    Sep 23, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

  • Sue
    Aug 14, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

  • Natalie Tyler
    Jan 31, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

  • Michael
    Jul 29, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

    You easily get a sense of Hall's life winding down in this collection of essays he wrote as he neared the age of 90 and was, indeed, nearing the end of his life. To call this collection a masterpiece, would be misguided. Yet, it's a compelling read filled with little insights, warm aff...

    Beautifully written, by a former poet laureate , this collection of essays on nearing 90 speaks to the author's experience of being elderly and its challenges. Being that age, he doesn't feel the need to hold anything back, and this is an insightful view of his experiences. Mr. Hall is...

    There are many things I liked and enjoyed about this book - having just finished it, I find it difficult to try to organize a suitable short explanation of why I enjoyed. One comment would simply be that I am a typical (I fear) individual who only occasionally reads a poem or feels muc...

  • Eric
    Jul 19, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

  • Edward
    Sep 30, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

  • Rachel Watkins
    May 06, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

  • Roberta
    Nov 26, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

  • Joan Colby
    Feb 03, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

  • Rhonda Lomazow
    Jul 07, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

  • TL
    Aug 21, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

  • Lorena
    Feb 24, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

  • Kay
    Sep 08, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

    You easily get a sense of Hall's life winding down in this collection of essays he wrote as he neared the age of 90 and was, indeed, nearing the end of his life. To call this collection a masterpiece, would be misguided. Yet, it's a compelling read filled with little insights, warm aff...

    Beautifully written, by a former poet laureate , this collection of essays on nearing 90 speaks to the author's experience of being elderly and its challenges. Being that age, he doesn't feel the need to hold anything back, and this is an insightful view of his experiences. Mr. Hall is...

  • Richard Propes
    Apr 07, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

    You easily get a sense of Hall's life winding down in this collection of essays he wrote as he neared the age of 90 and was, indeed, nearing the end of his life. To call this collection a masterpiece, would be misguided. Yet, it's a compelling read filled with little insights, warm aff...

  • April
    Dec 24, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

  • D.j. Lang
    Oct 30, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

  • Pamela Small
    Aug 05, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

  • Will Chin
    Dec 09, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

  • Robert
    May 12, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

    You easily get a sense of Hall's life winding down in this collection of essays he wrote as he neared the age of 90 and was, indeed, nearing the end of his life. To call this collection a masterpiece, would be misguided. Yet, it's a compelling read filled with little insights, warm aff...

    Beautifully written, by a former poet laureate , this collection of essays on nearing 90 speaks to the author's experience of being elderly and its challenges. Being that age, he doesn't feel the need to hold anything back, and this is an insightful view of his experiences. Mr. Hall is...

    There are many things I liked and enjoyed about this book - having just finished it, I find it difficult to try to organize a suitable short explanation of why I enjoyed. One comment would simply be that I am a typical (I fear) individual who only occasionally reads a poem or feels muc...

    With his recent death, we have now lost another of the strongest poetic voices of the 20th century - but not without some magnificent parting shots. His early book of essays, "String Too Short To Be Saved" is among my all-time favorite memoirs. "80 Things to Do When You Turn 80" was wi...

  • Mike
    Jan 25, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

  • Charlotte
    Dec 31, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

    I was enticed to read this book by seeing the opening paragraphs on Twitter. Here's a man, I thought, who can write, with humour, about old age and dealing with it. Well, yes, that was the opening section of a bunch of mostly short 'essays' on a variety of topics which became increas...

    You easily get a sense of Hall's life winding down in this collection of essays he wrote as he neared the age of 90 and was, indeed, nearing the end of his life. To call this collection a masterpiece, would be misguided. Yet, it's a compelling read filled with little insights, warm aff...

    Beautifully written, by a former poet laureate , this collection of essays on nearing 90 speaks to the author's experience of being elderly and its challenges. Being that age, he doesn't feel the need to hold anything back, and this is an insightful view of his experiences. Mr. Hall is...

    There are many things I liked and enjoyed about this book - having just finished it, I find it difficult to try to organize a suitable short explanation of why I enjoyed. One comment would simply be that I am a typical (I fear) individual who only occasionally reads a poem or feels muc...

    With his recent death, we have now lost another of the strongest poetic voices of the 20th century - but not without some magnificent parting shots. His early book of essays, "String Too Short To Be Saved" is among my all-time favorite memoirs. "80 Things to Do When You Turn 80" was wi...

    This year started early with the death of an internet friend, a photographer, who I never met in person. It continued in spring with the death of a childhood friend, who left the earth not long after a brilliant whirlwind tour of Italy with her long loved husband and beloved daughter. ...

  • Mike Zickar
    Apr 19, 2019

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

  • JQAdams
    Dec 31, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. Ally my opinions are my own. --- Hits and misses... he writes well, but most of it wasn't very engaging for me. I'm in the minority it seems *shrugs* Maybe I just wasn't the right audience for this. ...

    Sometimes titles are particularly apt, and this is true of Donald Hall's book. He died this past summer at the age of 89. When you get to be that age, you've experienced plenty of losses, and have to be anticipating the biggest loss of all, your life. But at the same time, Hall kept wr...

    Hall's reflections and memories are haunted by loss. As he continues to stumble through his final years, being a widower becomes not more familiar but more hauntingly depressing. This book does not provide any peppy affirmations about aging but is rather a lament. The lament comes in s...

    A beautiful and meandering book written by poet Donald Hall as he neared ninety (he died several months before hitting that milestone). Topics that the book covers are aging, reminiscences of fellow poets, his life and marriage with poet Jane Kenyon, family history, and living on a New...

    Donald Hall wrote so openly and honestly of aging.He held nothing back the fact that the older he got the more naps he needed remembering his younger years.When he talks about Jane Kenyon his love a young woman he met when she was in his college class. How they fell in love built a lif...

    Amazing. From the book flap: "New essays from the vantage point of very old age ..." Donald Hall, the former poet laureate and husband of poet Jane Kenyon, has written this gem of book as he approaches the age of ninety. Many essays will make you laugh out loud; many are short and swee...

    I'm biased when talking about anything Donald Hall but I loved this book. Hall is/was a genius of understated, simple poetics that rose above its own simplicity and earthiness. His poetry should be assigned life-reading (imho) and the idea of him and Jane Kenyon writing in the same hou...

    Donald Hall who died last year produced a final book of prose subtitled Notes Nearing Ninety. A work of remarkable candor and charm his prose has not suffered from the advent of great age, though it is a subject he treats with wryness, humor and sometimes despair. A number of his essay...

    Maybe if you haven't been in love with Donald Hall forever, maybe if Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon are not your favorite love story ever, maybe you wouldn't think this should get five stars. I mean, he wrote it in his late eighties. It is imperfect and uneven, and very powerful and beaut...

    I did not know who Donald Hall was before I read this. I read a review of this somewhere. It wasn't as depressing as it sounds. A lot of it was pretty funny actually. Donald Hall was the poet laureate of America about 10 years ago. He was married to Jane Kenyon who died of leukemia at ...

    Reading Hall's A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES is like a visit with an old friend. The essays run the gamut from his opinion on the resurgence of beards to the origin story for his infamous children's book, OX-CART MAN, which was originally a poem. Antidotes about dinner parties with T. S. Eliot....

    Read this in one day and enjoyed it immensely. Another old guy who knows how to write. ...

    I read this final book of Donald Hall's close on the heels of his Essays After Eighty (You can find that review here.) However, I did not want to review two growing old books, one after the other, especially one with a title about losses. At the time that I read the book, I still had a...

    OK, it's more like 3.5. I generally stay away from prose written by poets. Call me uncivilised, but I am generally not a fan of poetry. But when I heard about this book ? A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety by Donald Hall ? I just couldn't pass it up. Death and dying are...

    Unless his estate surfaces unpublished pieces, this is the last of Donald Hall's work, and I will miss reading something new of his. With honesty, sometimes, humility, and always, humor, Donald Hall remembers what is important about his heritage, family, and writing life as well as wha...

    I think I might have read Essays after Eighty, but nothing about it stuck with me, and it's not like the memoir of a poet was ever likely to resonate with someone who usually gets nothing out of poetry. So I probably wouldn't have bothered with this sequel, except it was very small and...

  • Ellyn Lem
    Jul 26, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...

    Hall passed away as this book was being published so we have lost our Virgil of longevity. What you need to let go of, what you need to cling to, how you can find meaning and value in a world that still engages you to the best of your declining abilities?and a model for looking at is...

    A delight! Painful and funny, a heads up for writers looking ahead to old age, or for humans. Writers are humans too, after all! The many ways you can lose your dentures. Demolishing your automatic garage door not once but twice because you forgot it was there. Deciding that the abilit...

    I bet if someone is an ardent fan of Donald Hall's poetry, that person would revel in this latest collection of essays written in his late 80s. The novelist Ann Patchett is one such fan and has heartily endorsed the collection, which is how I had heard of it. While somewhat familiar wi...

  • Gerri
    Jul 26, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

  • Bookish
    Jun 22, 2018

    My thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. I expected more reflection on the process and peculiarities of aging. I expected less (or no) opinions of other poets, nor the ad nauseam rendition of the past 150 years of family history and circa 1865 farmhouse....

    I had read and enjoyed Hall's previous set of essays, so what was to lose in reading these? Nothing, though much gained. Although some of the material covered subjects read about in the last issue (wife Jane Kenyon's death, his New Hampshire grandparents and Connecticut mom, etc.),...

    It dismays me that I had to learn of this book only through the obituary for Donald Hall, poet, editor, anthologizer, Poet Laureate. This final collection of essays and reminiscences was ready for release when Hall died in late June 2018, a few months shy of his ninetieth birthday. ...

    Until I saw a write up about this book in my local newspaper, I had no idea who Donald Hall was. The synopsis of the book was so intriguing that I had to read it and I?m so glad I did!!!! One of the best reads this summer. Mr. Hall is so open and honest in this writing about everythi...

    This is beloved poet Donald Hall?s moving memoir A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety. Hall?s late wife, Jane Kenyon, is one of my favorite contemporary poets, so I have a soft spot for Hall anyway, but when I read his essay ?Between Solitude and Loneliness? in The New Yo...