Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump

Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump

?Believe me? may be the most commonly used phrase in Donald Trump?s lexicon. Whether about building a wall or protecting the Christian heritage, the refrain is constant. And to the surprise of many, about 80% percent of white evangelicals have believed Trump-at least enough to help propel him into the White House. Historian John Fea is not surprised-and in Believe Me he ex ?Believe me? may be the most commonly used phrase in Donald Trump?s lexicon. Whether about building a wall or...

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Title:Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump
Author:John Fea
Rating:
Genres:Politics
ISBN:0802876412
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:208 pages pages

Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump Reviews

  • Mehrsa
    Aug 18, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

    **Borrowed from the conclusion of the book** How might evangelical politics change if we replaced fear with hope? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced the pursuit of power with the cultivation of humility? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced nostalgia...

    John Fea?s book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, is helpful because Fea is an evangelical Christian himself. He dedicates his book to the 19 percent of evangelicals who did not vote for Donald Trump, including, obviously, himself. This 19 percent have not receive...

    I received this ARC from net galley in exchange for an honest review. I thought that this book was a really interesting analysis of the evangelical right and their interest and support for Trump. I thought it was an interesting addition to the literature about the increasing divide h...

    In "Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump" John Fea traces the history of Evangelicalism to attempt to figure out how it was possible for such a large percentage of Evangelical voters to cast their votes for someone like Trump, whose character flaws were disqualifying in any...

    I am so glad that evangelical Christians are speaking out about the rot of the movement. I am not an evangelical, but I am a Christian and I cannot understand how anyone can read the Christian texts and support the Trump's rhetoric. I didn't agree with some of Fea's positions (I am pro...

  • Whitney
    Aug 18, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

    **Borrowed from the conclusion of the book** How might evangelical politics change if we replaced fear with hope? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced the pursuit of power with the cultivation of humility? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced nostalgia...

  • Deanna
    Jul 04, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

    **Borrowed from the conclusion of the book** How might evangelical politics change if we replaced fear with hope? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced the pursuit of power with the cultivation of humility? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced nostalgia...

    John Fea?s book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, is helpful because Fea is an evangelical Christian himself. He dedicates his book to the 19 percent of evangelicals who did not vote for Donald Trump, including, obviously, himself. This 19 percent have not receive...

    I received this ARC from net galley in exchange for an honest review. I thought that this book was a really interesting analysis of the evangelical right and their interest and support for Trump. I thought it was an interesting addition to the literature about the increasing divide h...

    In "Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump" John Fea traces the history of Evangelicalism to attempt to figure out how it was possible for such a large percentage of Evangelical voters to cast their votes for someone like Trump, whose character flaws were disqualifying in any...

  • Steve
    Mar 11, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

  • Adam Shields
    Jul 02, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

  • Peter Kerry Powers
    Jun 07, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

  • Alexandria Fanjoy
    Mar 13, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

    **Borrowed from the conclusion of the book** How might evangelical politics change if we replaced fear with hope? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced the pursuit of power with the cultivation of humility? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced nostalgia...

    John Fea?s book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, is helpful because Fea is an evangelical Christian himself. He dedicates his book to the 19 percent of evangelicals who did not vote for Donald Trump, including, obviously, himself. This 19 percent have not receive...

    I received this ARC from net galley in exchange for an honest review. I thought that this book was a really interesting analysis of the evangelical right and their interest and support for Trump. I thought it was an interesting addition to the literature about the increasing divide h...

  • Joe
    Aug 17, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

  • Matt Grant
    Mar 28, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

  • Caleb
    May 30, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

  • Ann
    Aug 03, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

    In the struggle to understand how conservative Christian evangelicals, the same men and women who profess to be followers of Jesus Christ, could not only support a morally bankrupt presidential candidate like Donald Trump but overwhelmingly vote him into office, John Fea's Believe Me i...

    **Borrowed from the conclusion of the book** How might evangelical politics change if we replaced fear with hope? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced the pursuit of power with the cultivation of humility? How might evangelical politics change if we replaced nostalgia...

    John Fea?s book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, is helpful because Fea is an evangelical Christian himself. He dedicates his book to the 19 percent of evangelicals who did not vote for Donald Trump, including, obviously, himself. This 19 percent have not receive...

  • Jason Kanz
    Jul 07, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

  • Joan
    Jul 19, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

  • Jay
    Jun 19, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

  • D.L. Mayfield
    Jul 15, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

  • Daniel
    Jul 06, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

  • Bob H
    Jul 22, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

  • Ashley
    Feb 28, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

  • Joel Wentz
    Aug 16, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

  • Josh
    Feb 17, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

  • Eric Manuel
    Jun 28, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

    If you find yourself asking, "How the hell did 81% of evangelical Christians throw their support behind the Donald Trump in the 2016 election?" then John Fea's Believe Me is the book for you. However, Fea - a historian at the Messiah College in Pennsylvania - contends that no one wi...

    Whenever there is a presidential election, inevitably there are books published about the winner. Since 2016, this has not changed. What is significant about Donald Trump's win, however, is the support that he had, and still has, garnered from Evangelical Christians. Many within evange...

  • Samuel P.
    Jun 29, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

  • Sandra Reyes
    Jun 12, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

  • Joel Mitchell
    Apr 22, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

    With his background as a professor of U.S. history and as an Evangelical Christian himself, John Fea is well-placed to explain a central paradox: how U.S. Evangelicals could embrace this vulgar, Scripturally-illiterate ("Two Corinthians"? Really?), womanizing, latter-day Emperor Nero, ...

    A staggering 81% of white evangelicals voted for Donald Trump! How are we to explain this? Fea, an astute historian from Messiah College, identifies an unholy trinity of fear, power and nostalgia as being at the roots of this bizarre voting pattern. As he explains: ?I approach thi...

    As someone who grew up steeped in the conservative political world of the Evangelical Christian movement in the US, I was continually stunned by the ability (and willingness) of Evangelicals to continue to make excuses for the seemingly un-Christian behavior, attitudes, and rhetoric of...

    Short Review: I am probably primed to like this book for reasons outside of the book. I listen to Fea's history podcast, I vote democrat traditionally, so this book is not a critique of my voting or my party and I already have a very shaky relationship with the current cultural/sociolo...

    My earliest clear memory of American politics is of conservative Christians howling ?Character counts! Bill Clinton is not morally qualified to be president and must be impeached!?. Fast forward to 2016 and many of these same voices eagerly led 81% of white Evangelical Christians t...

  • J.K. Turner
    Jun 27, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

  • Jared Deame
    Jun 15, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

  • Mike Fendrich
    Aug 15, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...

    John Fea gives me (and people like me) permission to think hard about history, to be critical and confidently ant-Trump, while remaining committed to the hope and renewal that *smart* evangelicalism can offer our country. This is a thoughtful book, unpacking the themes of fear, power a...

    A fascinating look at the fear and nostalgia that drove the support of Trump by white Evangelicals. Fea does well to include the history of the Evangelical movement and does so more succinctly, and perhaps more effectively, than Fitzgerald?s volume on American Evangelical history. Th...

    I received ?Believe Me? by John Fea as an advanced reading copy from NetGalley. The thing I love most about this book is that it was written by a self-proclaimed evangelical who also happens to be a historian. I love that John Fea used history to back his claims. I found some parts...

    (From an Advanced Reading Copy) John Fea has accomplished what too few historians can do: he has skillfully combined an overview history of his subject with modern events and commentary. Fea truthfully and importantly recognizes that this book took him "beyond history and into soci...

    This book bills itself as a book about the way evangelicals received Trump, by an evangelical; speaking their language, interpreting from the inside, as it were. It was definitely interesting to hear from someone not outright rejecting the evangelical premise, though little of it was r...

    My Rating - Must Read Level - Short, easy read Summary The subtitle kind of says it all. How did Evangelicals so overwhelmingly support Trump (more than any other candidate in history)? He received 81% of self identified Evangelicals. There are people who dispute the support, ...

    I had seen John Fea's book, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump (2018), featured on Eerdman's Facebook and Twitter feeds. I had never heard of him, but there was enough present in those short social media posts to intrigue me. Fea is an evangelical and chair of the history...

    As a Christian, I understand that evangelical is a good word to describe me and millions of other Americans who take their faith, the Scriptures and God seriously. However, as I sit here typing this in August of 2018, I cringe when someone lumps me in that group. The word represents so...

  • Shereen Lee
    Mar 01, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

  • Jared Wilson
    Jul 20, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

  • Johanna
    Jul 02, 2018

    I am not sure what surprised me more during the 2016 presidential campaign: Donald Trump?s electoral college victory or the overwhelming and unqualified support he received from so many self-professed Evangelicals. I did not understand how a person possessing as blatantly a disreput...

    I've struggled to understand for two years now the (white) evangelical turnabout -- or apparent turnabout, I suppose -- on matters of character, ethics, and witness in relation to the overwhelming support for now-President Donald Trump. As a child of the 80's I recall how adamantly it ...

    An interesting take on evangelical Christian culture in the U.S., this was a book that presented questions, answers, and yet more questions about the past and future of American religious and political identity. Fea's perspective as an anti-Trump evangelical provides a nuanced analysis...

    Beginning with the obligatory notice that I?m friends with and work with the author, I will say I found John?s historical analysis of fear at the root of much evangelical politics to be compelling and useful. Although he doesn?t go there, for those of us who either grew up in or ...

    On November 8, 2016, Donald J. Trump won the American presidency. The next day, I heard someone singing. I recognized the tune as the late 19th Century hymn ?Jesus Saves?, but the words sounded off. What should have been ?We have heard the joyful sound / Jesus Saves! Jesus Saves!...

    This was a book I was looking forward to for months. I follow John Fea on Twitter and read his blog. His perspective as an evangelical AND historian is one that gives me hope as an evangelical who is tempted to chuck the term "evangelical" altogether. Fea gives a very fast sketch o...

    This is a book that can be read by the vast majority of evangelicals I know--which makes it perfectly suited to ask the question I wish we had been asking all along. What if we replaced fear with hope? The lust for power with the quest for humility? Nostalgia with accurate history? The...

    I read this book in my continuing quest to understand the 2016 US presidential election. Fea is an evangelical Christian historian. His book helped me understand how Trump convinced evangelicals he was a Christian, despite his many blunders and reports of sexual assault. Trump's immora...

    In John Fea?s new book Believe Me, he argues that the issues of fear, power, and nostalgia have been present throughout the history of white evangelicals in America and thus have contributed to the rise of Donald Trump as president. I first became acquainted with Dr. Fea?s work whi...