Nothing Good Can Come from This

Nothing Good Can Come from This

Kristi Coulter inspired and incensed the internet when she wrote about what happened when she stopped drinking. Nothing Good Can Come from This is her debut--a frank, funny, and feminist essay collection by a keen-eyed observer no longer numbed into complacency. When Kristi stopped drinking, she started noticing things. Like when you give up a debilitating habit, it leaves Kristi Coulter inspired and incensed the internet when she wrote about what happened when she stopped drinking. Nothin...

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Title:Nothing Good Can Come from This
Author:Kristi Coulter
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:0374286205
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:224 pages pages

Nothing Good Can Come from This Reviews

  • Katherine Pittman
    May 01, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

    I thought this was great. It reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love just with a lot of drinking. This book of essays tells the story of how and why Coulter quit drinking. A think a lot of what she has to say can be applied to many aspects of life. People have different addictions and...

    Nothing Good can Come from This is a series of essays that surprised me as really quite good.. Revolving about the author's difficulty with drinking and quitting, it brings a poignant and entertaining series of stories. The book is well written, enjoyable and yet brings out a lot of em...

    Nothing Good Can Come from This by Kristi Coulter is a memoir comprised of essays. It?s witty in a David Sedaris kind of way, but it?s about a serious topic: the author?s battle with alcoholism. Actually, it?s mostly about her journey towards accepting that she had proble...

    Thank you to Net Galley for the Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. I have mixed feelings on this book. As another reviewer put it, some essay's were a 2 and some a 5. I found the book very real and relatable. She has a very dry sense of humor, whi...

  • Liz
    Nov 16, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

  • lit.erary.britt
    Aug 22, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

  • Katherine Gypson
    Apr 26, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

  • Joy
    Dec 10, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

  • Emily
    Mar 13, 2019

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

  • Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell
    Sep 22, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

  • Laura Hoffman Brauman
    Sep 05, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

  • Laura Santoski
    Jan 27, 2019

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

  • Brigitt
    May 07, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

    I thought this was great. It reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love just with a lot of drinking. This book of essays tells the story of how and why Coulter quit drinking. A think a lot of what she has to say can be applied to many aspects of life. People have different addictions and...

    Nothing Good can Come from This is a series of essays that surprised me as really quite good.. Revolving about the author's difficulty with drinking and quitting, it brings a poignant and entertaining series of stories. The book is well written, enjoyable and yet brings out a lot of em...

    Nothing Good Can Come from This by Kristi Coulter is a memoir comprised of essays. It?s witty in a David Sedaris kind of way, but it?s about a serious topic: the author?s battle with alcoholism. Actually, it?s mostly about her journey towards accepting that she had proble...

    Thank you to Net Galley for the Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. I have mixed feelings on this book. As another reviewer put it, some essay's were a 2 and some a 5. I found the book very real and relatable. She has a very dry sense of humor, whi...

    Nothing good can come from this Kristi Coulter This is a fascinating and at the same time scary book. Kristi tells honestly and directly her difficult process to first recognise her alcohol dependency and then her difficult struggle to stay sober. She lets the reader get an honest loo...

  • Katie Dillon
    Aug 17, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

  • Célèste
    Jan 11, 2019

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

  • Kitty
    Nov 14, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

  • Tamsien West (Babbling Books)
    Sep 13, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

  • Catherine Coles
    Aug 25, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

    I thought this was great. It reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love just with a lot of drinking. This book of essays tells the story of how and why Coulter quit drinking. A think a lot of what she has to say can be applied to many aspects of life. People have different addictions and...

    Nothing Good can Come from This is a series of essays that surprised me as really quite good.. Revolving about the author's difficulty with drinking and quitting, it brings a poignant and entertaining series of stories. The book is well written, enjoyable and yet brings out a lot of em...

    Nothing Good Can Come from This by Kristi Coulter is a memoir comprised of essays. It?s witty in a David Sedaris kind of way, but it?s about a serious topic: the author?s battle with alcoholism. Actually, it?s mostly about her journey towards accepting that she had proble...

  • Valerity (Val)
    Jun 26, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

  • Lori
    Feb 10, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

  • Bonnye Reed
    Apr 07, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

  • Lissa
    Jul 23, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

  • Christine
    Oct 21, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

  • Ramona Mead
    Sep 02, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

  • Rene Denfeld
    Aug 07, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

  • Karen Nelson
    Jul 23, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

    I thought this was great. It reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love just with a lot of drinking. This book of essays tells the story of how and why Coulter quit drinking. A think a lot of what she has to say can be applied to many aspects of life. People have different addictions and...

    Nothing Good can Come from This is a series of essays that surprised me as really quite good.. Revolving about the author's difficulty with drinking and quitting, it brings a poignant and entertaining series of stories. The book is well written, enjoyable and yet brings out a lot of em...

  • Kristy K
    Jul 17, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

  • Books on Stereo
    Sep 29, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

  • Sarah-louise Raillard
    Aug 13, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

  • Carolyn
    Apr 30, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

  • Robin Bonne
    Apr 14, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

  • Sarah
    Jul 27, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...

    At turns hilarious and poignant, this is a recovery book that breaks all the stereotypes. ...

    An essay collection reflecting on the author's struggle with alcoholism. Overall I though the writing was really sharp and personal, but as a whole the collection lacked depth and perspective. ...

    I was surprised by just how much I liked this book! Coulter is funny and frank, and it certainly helps that we like the same stuff and live in the same place. There's a whole essay about The Pantry's farm camp, something I've dreamed about doing (although now that I know you have to ki...

    Do I need all of the addiction memoirs I read to feature serious drama? Fifty percent of the book showcasing mortifying scenes of the author's obvious plummet to rock bottom followed by the other fifty percent spent in rehab with a mostly happy ending? I definitely don't think everyone...

    I tore through this and loved every minute. I want to reread it. This is my favorite kind of book. All the essays stand alone and work together. It?s about her sobriety, but it?s about so much more, too: feminism and marriage and career and money and sex. Her voice is extremely fun...

    I'll be honest, I had this book on my NetGalley shelf for over three months and was avoiding it because I was afraid it would inspire me to quit drinking (something I've been considering for approximately a decade) Initially I thought the author was going to come across as self righteo...

    I thought this was great. It reminded me a little of Eat, Pray, Love just with a lot of drinking. This book of essays tells the story of how and why Coulter quit drinking. A think a lot of what she has to say can be applied to many aspects of life. People have different addictions and...

  • Lisa Gabriele
    Dec 18, 2018

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I wasn't expecting much when I picked up NOTHING GOOD CAN COME FROM THIS, which is maybe why it completely blew all of my preconceived notions of what it would be about out of the water. Rather than being the typical navel...

    "This is why I drank, you know. Because I wanted every day to be like that. I wanted every day to feel like a movie montage, or at least to end in an epiphany, or at least to have a clear narrative arc, or at least to make some level of sense." 3.5 Stars A memoir told in essay fo...

    A memoir of the author?s experiences of life, written in a series of relatable essays, including her battle with alcohol and how she used various things to distract from it, such as work, running, being a foodie, AA, and other obsessions. I like the tone used and the way it?s told ...

    I loved these essays. Coulter is a sharp writer, full of wisdom and humor. I think humor is one of the hardest forms to master (I sure haven't), and Coulter is brilliant at it: warm and compassionate and incisively funny. She dissects how the pressures of being a woman today can lead d...

    GNab Kristi Coulter can take the most heart wrenching self doubt, the emotional writhing women tend to put themselves through on a fairly regular basis, and turn it around into a hoot. I haven't laughed so much in years. And she manages as well to point out many things women in general...

    This is one of the rare collections that can change lives and I don?t say that lightly. Coulter writes frankly about getting sober with essays that detail her life before, during, and after. She writes about becoming a runner, the bullshit women have to deal with, and the human condi...

    Nothing Good Can Come From This is a brilliant, raw portrayal of a the Author?s struggle with alcoholism. ...

    The opening essay, Enjoli, alludes to how maybe excessive drinking is a by-product of being a ?24 hour woman,? which is an analogy for the sociological concept of ?the second shift.? I thought it was interesting. For my own reasons, I do not drink alcohol and found many of the ...

    This is a well written memoir and the author lives in Seattle so that was interesting to me. It's a quick read but I guess I was expecting more due to the high ratings here. ...

    I wanted to like this soooooo much more than I did. It was okay! I respect any person who is vulnerable enough to share their story with the world, and I think Kristi had a lot of valuable points to make about why women drink. Some of her essays were downright beautiful. The letter to ...

    Coulter's essay collection about what happens when she stops drinking is both raw and heartfelt -- and also wickedly sharp and humorous at times. Coulter definitely comes from a place of financial privilege -- and she acknowledges this multiple times throughout the collection. She look...

    There are enjoyable parts to this, and I like the focus on sobriety, but I got sick of the author's apparent amazement with her uniqueness, especially in the essay "Desire Lines." I was shocked that she wrote this in at least her forties - she often comes off as a teenager. When she ac...

    I really love Kristi Coulter?s writing. I came across her because of her viral article on Medium, then read through her blog - so of course I was gonna read her book too. There are no earth-shattering insights in here, but she?s honest and brave and funny, and it was well worth the...

    Note: I received this book from the author/publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of memoir/essays told with dry wit. Like enough to say it's probably one of my favorite genres. So maybe I'm biased, maybe I'm burnt out of realistic humor writing, may...

    A new favorite book for me - to sit alongside the work of Cheryl Strayed, Heather Havrilesky and Sarah Hepola. I know a book will stay with me when I have to read it with my journal by my side because the author is prompting me to ask new questions about my own life - to think and look...

    I like to read personal essays but I've realized that the more that I relate to an author, the more that I enjoy the essays and I really related to Kristi Coulter. I found this full of low-key humor and so many sentences that I ended up highlighting because it fell so true to me. M...

    ?Can you ask the bartender to make me something nonalcoholic that isn't sweet?'... What he got was a coupe glass filled with something that tasted a little like tea, a little like soda, and a lot like belonging. It was delicious" ?What I'm thinking, but don't know yet how to s...

    3.5 stars. some of her essays were a full 5/5, others a 2. Kristi's honesty, retrospection, and introspection are raw and painstakingly detailed. Her journey is a truly remarkable story of determination, grit, and willpower to become truly alive in the world without the burden of a lon...

    An instant classic in the 'soberlit' genre, up there with Drinking, A Love Story, Blackout and Lit. Even if you don't have a drinking problem, this book is a warm and lyrical look at compulsions and distractions, and all the ways we try to get out of the "here and now", and how futile ...