What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America

What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America

A stunning follow up to New York Times bestseller Tears We Cannot Stop, a timely exploration of America's tortured racial politics In 2015 BLM activist Julius Jones confronted Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with an urgent query: ?What in your heart has changed that?s going to change the direction of this country?? ?I don?t believe you just change hearts,? she prot A stunning follow up to New York Times bestseller Tears We Cannot Stop, a timely exploration of America's...

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Title:What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America
Author:Michael Eric Dyson
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:B076ZRB4CG
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:306 pages pages

What Truth Sounds Like: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America Reviews

  • Jeff Scott
    May 22, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

  • Jamey
    Jun 25, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

  • Michelle
    Jun 27, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

  • Adam Shields
    Jun 08, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

  • Barbaraleah
    Jul 02, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

  • Didi
    Jun 05, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

  • Reading in Black & White
    Jun 10, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

  • Andre
    May 06, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

  • Andre
    May 17, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

  • Patrice Hoffman
    May 18, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

  • Pamela
    Jul 17, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

  • Tim
    Jul 10, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

  • Ethan
    Jun 26, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

  • Nicole
    Jun 19, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

    As someone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, albeit as a young person, I found this book so compelling that I was stopping as I read to write down quotes from Dyson's writing. In fact, I had borrowed this book from my local library, and now, I've decided I must buy this an...

    I am struggling with what Dr. Dyson's latest work adds to the discourse save a cursory walk through the last 50ish years of our issues of race and some of the inner conversations. It seemed at times as an apologetic treatise for the failures of Obama and how great Hiliary was through a...

    Dyson modestly does not present himself as the true heir to James Baldwin (not Ta-Nehisi Coates and certainly not Cornel West), but I believe he is. Like Baldwin, he knows how to eloquently preach to his readers, probably because he is a preacher as Baldwin was before he became a write...

    Unfortunately this was a DNF for me, which is too bad. I had been looking forward to reading this book after I recently read Dyson's "Tears We Cannot Stop," since I've become a big fan of both Baldwin and RFK in the last few years, and was excited to read about this meeting that I've h...

  • Michael Huang
    Aug 18, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

  • Dustin
    Jul 06, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

  • Yanira
    Jun 24, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

  • Janet
    Aug 12, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

  • Jeri Rowe
    Jul 03, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

  • Mary Sisney
    Jul 12, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

    As someone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, albeit as a young person, I found this book so compelling that I was stopping as I read to write down quotes from Dyson's writing. In fact, I had borrowed this book from my local library, and now, I've decided I must buy this an...

    I am struggling with what Dr. Dyson's latest work adds to the discourse save a cursory walk through the last 50ish years of our issues of race and some of the inner conversations. It seemed at times as an apologetic treatise for the failures of Obama and how great Hiliary was through a...

    Dyson modestly does not present himself as the true heir to James Baldwin (not Ta-Nehisi Coates and certainly not Cornel West), but I believe he is. Like Baldwin, he knows how to eloquently preach to his readers, probably because he is a preacher as Baldwin was before he became a write...

  • Rachel
    Jul 06, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

  • Ruby
    Jun 23, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

  • Leah
    Aug 13, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

  • Shadoshard
    Aug 20, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

  • Darian Jones
    Jun 23, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

    As someone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, albeit as a young person, I found this book so compelling that I was stopping as I read to write down quotes from Dyson's writing. In fact, I had borrowed this book from my local library, and now, I've decided I must buy this an...

    I am struggling with what Dr. Dyson's latest work adds to the discourse save a cursory walk through the last 50ish years of our issues of race and some of the inner conversations. It seemed at times as an apologetic treatise for the failures of Obama and how great Hiliary was through a...

  • Kusaimamekirai
    Jun 16, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

  • Corvus
    May 05, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

  • Synthia Salomon, Ed.S.
    Aug 18, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

    As someone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, albeit as a young person, I found this book so compelling that I was stopping as I read to write down quotes from Dyson's writing. In fact, I had borrowed this book from my local library, and now, I've decided I must buy this an...

    I am struggling with what Dr. Dyson's latest work adds to the discourse save a cursory walk through the last 50ish years of our issues of race and some of the inner conversations. It seemed at times as an apologetic treatise for the failures of Obama and how great Hiliary was through a...

    Dyson modestly does not present himself as the true heir to James Baldwin (not Ta-Nehisi Coates and certainly not Cornel West), but I believe he is. Like Baldwin, he knows how to eloquently preach to his readers, probably because he is a preacher as Baldwin was before he became a write...

    Unfortunately this was a DNF for me, which is too bad. I had been looking forward to reading this book after I recently read Dyson's "Tears We Cannot Stop," since I've become a big fan of both Baldwin and RFK in the last few years, and was excited to read about this meeting that I've h...

    Conduit between bearing witness and policy changes in the civil rights 1960s. Robert Kennedy changes his perspective and becomes motivated to change federal laws and is assassinated. *James Baldwin: set huge standards for Black Intellectuals *Harry Belafonte: vocally call out thos...

  • MGF
    Jun 27, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

  • Wanda Adams
    Aug 10, 2018

    Click the link for my review. https://browngirlreading.com/2018/06/... ...

    What the truth sounds like, and is for me as I sit here and write this review is that I don't know how to review books such as this. Part of me wants to offer a review that strictly focuses on the writing. That (cowardly) part wants to remain neutral in all works that are social hot to...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    I?m not sure how I feel about this book. It?s nominal premise is based on a little known meeting in late May 1963 between then Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Black intellectuals, activists and entertainers ranging from James Baldwin to Lena Horne to Lorraine Hansberry. It was...

    There was a meeting in 1963 between Robert F. Kennedy and James Baldwin and a few of Baldwin?s friends. When you think of an example of speaking truth to power, that meeting as described by Dyson here, will indeed standout as definitive. Dyson writes ?I heard over the years how...

    An excellent follow-up to Tears We Cannot Stop. Just as timely, too. I appreciated Dyson?s discussion of Bobby Kennedy?s meeting with James Baldwin and other African-American artists and intellectuals, and showed it as his turning point in advocating for great social justice. He co...

    An exploration of the black experience of America in terms of a meeting between RFK and many notable members of the black community in 1963. The author begins by describing the meeting between RFK, James Baldwin, and many other prominent black artists and intellectuals in 1963. RFK ...

    Dyson elaborates on this book in numerous YouTube videos - all highly engaging as he's a compelling speaker. Striking is how many parallels there are between the 60s and today and how little empathy we've practiced as a nation in hearing pain. Today's art is denial although that's beco...

    When I began Michael Eric Dyson's "What Truth Sounds Like," I found myself wondering if this book was going to be for me. I was previously unfamiliar with Dyson's work and the first passage of the book seemingly speaks of heroes and patriotic martyrs. I worried I was walking into anoth...

    This book begins with a description of the 1963 meeting in the NYC apartment of Joseph and Rose Kennedy. The meeting was attended by Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and many other notable people, without organization affiliation. There was also a young black civil ri...

    It?s no secret that I absolutely adore Michael Eric Dyson. I adore that he is unapologetically black at all times without reservation and the love he has has for his people is shining bright in his latest work. There are many highlighted passages and things I?ve learned in What Tru...

    The Kennedys didn?t really start to understand the plight of black people. In fact, they did the bare minimum ? until they had a meeting with activists and intellectuals in 1963. During that meeting, Jerome Smith spoke up about his experience that gradually made Robert Kennedy bett...

    This was fascinating--I did not know about this meeting at all, and Dyson even draws his discussion forward to current black artists, intellectuals, and even sports stars. All in his trademark beautiful style. I agree with Dyson's conclusion that we need to finish this conversation abo...

    MED leaves no stone unturned in this fabulous book/ conversation on race in America. This is another must read for every American. ...

    Especially enjoyed the chapter on activist athletes ("Activists 2"): a really great section and discussion of 'white privilege' reality in final section "Even If" (Wakanda Forever). ...

    An insightful, enjoyable read that is much-needed. I learned a ton and highly recommend. I loved the Wakanda chapter. ...

    This is not a review. Reviews are what you write when you've finished reading the book. I just started reading this one, and the only way I'm going to make it from page 20 to the end is by venting the frustration and disappointment I'm feeling at the quality of the prose. This book's i...

    This was such a good reading experience, I don?t know if my review would give it justice. In 1963 General Robert Kennedy reached out to Baldwin to put together a group that might help him to understand the black American experience. This book recounts that meeting & much more. Th...

    I have been wanting to reads this book since I heard Michael Eric Dyson interview on the view. The story centers around a meeting that took place in civil rights era between Bobby Kennedy, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, and other well known black activist at the time. Dyson states in ...

    "Baldwin understood that policy could never make white people think differently. The perception of black people often shapes how and when the law is applied. The moral dimensions of race exert a profound influence on how we distribute social goods, apply public policy and laws, and det...

    "Whatever his faults, or limits, Bobby Kennedy was committed to getting into a room and wrestling with the demons of race. Over fifty years later, we find it hard to follow this example, and our failure dooms us to untold suffering." As we observe the 50th anniversary of the assassi...

    Michael Eric Dyson's follow-up to "Tears We Cannot Stop" uses a 1963 meeting between Bobby Kennedy and James Baldwin as a touchstone to talk about the racism we as a country today. In a word -- or two -- Dyson's follow-up is pretty damn powerful. He writes: "Race is the big thing, a...

    Short Review: This is the fourth book I have read by Michael Eric Dyson in just over a year. Dyson is a cultural critic, essayist, theologian, and professor. What Truth Sounds Like is a follow up from his earlier Tears We Cannot Stop. That earlier book was a direct theological argument...

    From the Kennedy meetings in the 1960s to the recent acclaim of the movie Black Panther and what Wakanda means, Dyson sums up a discourse where people have to scream to have themselves heard and the painful part of this is that they still have to scream to be heard. And little gets don...

    This was an amazing, edifying read - especially to me - a white American who teaches high school African American students; especially to me who is devastated over how trump is denigrating our great country. The foundation of Dyson's book is a meeting between Bobby Kennedy, James (Jimm...

    As someone who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement, albeit as a young person, I found this book so compelling that I was stopping as I read to write down quotes from Dyson's writing. In fact, I had borrowed this book from my local library, and now, I've decided I must buy this an...