Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries

Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries

*Wall Street Journal bestseller *Next Big Idea Club selection--chosen by Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Dan Pink, and Adam Grant as one of the "two most groundbreaking new nonfiction reads of the season" *Washington Post's "10 Leadership Books to Watch for in 2019" *Inc.com's "10 Business Books You Need to Read in 2019" *Business Insider's "14 Books Everyone Will Be Reading i *Wall Street Journal bestseller *Next Big Idea Club selection--chosen by Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Dan Pink,...

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Title:Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries
Author:Safi Bahcall
Rating:
Genres:Business
ISBN:1250185963
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:368 pages pages

Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries Reviews

  • Howard
    Apr 16, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

  • Nathan Albright
    May 21, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

    Entertaining anecdotes on innovation. I find the developed framework of loonshots and how to foster them interesting and inspiring. However, I found the theory is based on anecdotes and generalisations too much for my taste. It actually contradicts other (more research-focused) books l...

    Moonshot: An ambitious and expensive goal Loonshot: A neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged. The most important breakthroughs are loonshots. Large groups are needed to translate these into technologies that win wars, products, or strategies ...

    No, it's not a typo for moonshot?a loonshot is "a neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged." Whereas the author defines moonshot as: "An ambitious and expensive goal, widely expected to have great significance." The author walks us through numerous hi...

    ?Loonshot: a neglected project widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged.? Loonshots are fragile despite their brilliance. Brilliant ideas or projects do not survive just because they are excellent or unique. Sometimes they are ignored for minor or reckless reasons...

    In reading this book it became very obvious that the author was someone who had a high view of science and medicine, a far higher view than I have myself, and wants to make a point that the problems with institutions are not so much about culture but about structure, comparing institut...

  • Mehrsa
    May 05, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

  • Emily
    Apr 29, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

  • Dolly
    Feb 24, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

  • Brad Lyerla
    Aug 01, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

  • Chia Evers
    Mar 25, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

  • Daniel
    May 05, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

  • Ali
    Feb 22, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

  • Bob
    Jul 14, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

  • Heidi The Reader
    Jul 13, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

  • Peter Tillman
    Jun 14, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

  • Mart
    May 01, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

  • Ethan
    May 19, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

  • Simon Hohenadl
    Apr 09, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

    Entertaining anecdotes on innovation. I find the developed framework of loonshots and how to foster them interesting and inspiring. However, I found the theory is based on anecdotes and generalisations too much for my taste. It actually contradicts other (more research-focused) books l...

  • Markus
    Apr 04, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

  • Aneil
    Jul 29, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

  • Dan Connors
    Jun 30, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

  • Dave
    Mar 28, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

  • Rob Delwo
    May 07, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

  • Boni Aditya
    Jul 20, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

  • Adam McNamara
    Aug 16, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

  • David Wygant
    Jul 30, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

  • Venky
    May 03, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

  • Ann (thebookisbetterann)
    May 27, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

  • Simon Eskildsen
    Sep 16, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

    Entertaining anecdotes on innovation. I find the developed framework of loonshots and how to foster them interesting and inspiring. However, I found the theory is based on anecdotes and generalisations too much for my taste. It actually contradicts other (more research-focused) books l...

    Moonshot: An ambitious and expensive goal Loonshot: A neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged. The most important breakthroughs are loonshots. Large groups are needed to translate these into technologies that win wars, products, or strategies ...

    No, it's not a typo for moonshot?a loonshot is "a neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged." Whereas the author defines moonshot as: "An ambitious and expensive goal, widely expected to have great significance." The author walks us through numerous hi...

  • Ronald J.
    May 24, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

    Entertaining anecdotes on innovation. I find the developed framework of loonshots and how to foster them interesting and inspiring. However, I found the theory is based on anecdotes and generalisations too much for my taste. It actually contradicts other (more research-focused) books l...

    Moonshot: An ambitious and expensive goal Loonshot: A neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged. The most important breakthroughs are loonshots. Large groups are needed to translate these into technologies that win wars, products, or strategies ...

  • Dan Gibson
    May 09, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

  • Anthony
    Jun 10, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

  • illy
    Sep 19, 2019

    "New frontiers of the mind are before us, and if they are pioneered with the same vision, boldness, and drive with which we have waged this war we can create fuller and more fruitful employment and a fuller and more fruitful life." ? Franklin Delano Roosevelt pg 257 Safi Bahcall h...

    I guess this is the new "disruption" book (even though he articulates the differences quite convincingly). Bahcall posits a theory of loonshots using a few emblamatic examples (actually the same ones everyone uses). This is sort of my fundamental problem with these sorts of books--they...

    Loonshots is a thought-provoking blend of history, physics, and business which seeks to explain group decision-making about "loonshots". I am a social scientist so the idea of thinking about group behavior through the lens of phase transitions (think ice to water or water to ice) was f...

    A cool and very readable account of technical history, innovation, and project management. I liked the author?s breezy, conversational style. He opens with Vannevar Bush just before WW2, starting a predecessor to DARPA, which wasn?t a big favorite of the prewar US military. But he ...

    You would imagine that the first time someone presented the idea of using a beam to detect ships and airplanes, or a drug to reduce cholesterol, or a drug to kill tumors by choking their blood supply, there would be wild jubilation welcoming such a world-shaking breakthrough. Aaaand y...

    a dynamite book. brilliantly written. good ideas. safi bahcall is a great story teller, and these tales are well worth telling. ...

    1. New ideas are fragile and require tremendous amount of protection all the way from the top. 2. World War 2: The German U-boats were sinking Allies ships. Radar saved the day, letting pilots find them in all weather. However the military did not like Radar, at least in its original...

    Was skeptical with the bombastic title at first, but this book shines as it recounts many notable inventions across industries and the multiple failures that preceded their eventual success. ...

    One might be forgiven for nursing a genuine assumption that the most famous ?Bush? surname belongs to one of two men, both of whom happened to be the Presidents of the United States of America at different intervals. Safi Bahcall, a second-generation physicist (the son of two ast...

    A very fascinating read. The opening story about the invention of radar and how it won World War 2, one which I had not heard before, was worth the read alone. The author goes into detail about how great advances in technology, art or technology are made and how we can nurture them be...

    Great anecdotes. Decently written. Little scientific rigor. The friend who gave me my copy said, ?you can read a chapter or two and you?ll get the idea.? Cannot disagree. ...

    Full disclosure?I did some of the research for Loonshots, so I know the book (and the author) quite well. That said, it's a fascinating mix of history, science, technology, and organizational management (and never did I think to use the words "fascinating" and "organizational managem...

    Loonshots was a fair book, but not overly great. The author did a poor job defining his terms, particularly the P-type definition was weakly delivered. Ultimately, the book reads like a dissertation that received encouragement from colleagues. The message was decent, just not overly we...

    Why this book: I listened to Tim Ferriss's interview with SafiBahcall and liked him and what he said - it was excellent. Also this book was a pick of The Next Big Idea Club, to which I belong. Summary in 3 Sentences: The thesis of this book is that our societyonly makes progress...

    A little wonky at times (although I find most business books are, so I might not be the right audience), but about 2/3 of the way through, it hit an interesting rhythm with helpful (to me) insights on the construction of teams and how to encourage innovation in an organization without ...

    "I'm still amazed by how often large companies compensate junior or mid-level employees on company earnings. If your project can move earnings by no more than a tiny fraction of a percent, how does a company-earnings bonus motivate you? You might as well put your energy into twiddling ...

    This is definitely one of the best books I have read in my life. This book along with - Where Good Ideas Come from: The Natural History of Innovation Mapping Innovation: A Playbook for Navigating a Disruptive Age Take a good jab at understanding ideas, innovations, startups and...

    What I love about Loonshots is how Bachall makes success seem more tangible. He doesn?t settle for a fluffy concept like culture where the amount of good culture isn?t actually measurable. He forms the magic number and theorizes ways to increase it. What I didn?t like was whe...

    Title, promotions and bonuses stifle innovation by making companies too conservative. Risk-averse organizations often miss out on these great leaps forward because they?re so focused on immediate results that they overlook the importance of creating structures that encourage experime...

    I read Loonshots as part of The Next Big Idea Bookclub and watched the accompanying videos on Teachable. I found the book to be very interesting, but some of the ideas and concepts were a little over-my-head, especially the concept that you should only have 150 connections because that...

    "A loonshot refers to an idea or project that most people think won't work, or if it does, it won't matter (it won't make money). This book is about how to nurture and successfully deliver those crazy ideas that change the World. Specifically, it presents four rules for discovering ...

    This book is an "S-type loonshot" to use its own jargon - it synthesizes management paradigms that have already been out there for a while, into a more practical and useful whole. One of the most enjoyable and useful management (and history!) books I've read in the recent past. ...

    I LOVED the stories of invention that the author used to prove his point. It was so refreshing to read about great inventors from the pre-internet era have the lessons applied to the modern era of business. ...

    Like most of these self development bestsellers it has a lot of fluff and tge first half of the book is spent on telling enterantaining historical anecdotes. But I enjoy a good story, the second part is a change of pace and it has a few good points so I'd not hesitate to recommend this...

    An Innovative Take on Innovation Applies concepts from physics and chemistry such as phase transitions and dynamic equilibrium to explain by how unpopular ideas can become industry-creating innovations. I disagree with his argument that culture does not explain such innovations. He...

    Entertaining anecdotes on innovation. I find the developed framework of loonshots and how to foster them interesting and inspiring. However, I found the theory is based on anecdotes and generalisations too much for my taste. It actually contradicts other (more research-focused) books l...

    Moonshot: An ambitious and expensive goal Loonshot: A neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged. The most important breakthroughs are loonshots. Large groups are needed to translate these into technologies that win wars, products, or strategies ...

    No, it's not a typo for moonshot?a loonshot is "a neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged." Whereas the author defines moonshot as: "An ambitious and expensive goal, widely expected to have great significance." The author walks us through numerous hi...

    ?Loonshot: a neglected project widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged.? Loonshots are fragile despite their brilliance. Brilliant ideas or projects do not survive just because they are excellent or unique. Sometimes they are ignored for minor or reckless reasons...