The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family

The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family

In this jaw-dropping, darkly comedic memoir, a young woman comes of age in a dysfunctional Asian family whose members blamed their woes on ghosts and demons when in fact they should have been on anti-psychotic meds. Lindsay Wong grew up with a paranoid schizophrenic grandmother and a mother who was deeply afraid of the "woo-woo"--Chinese ghosts who come to visit in times of In this jaw-dropping, darkly comedic memoir, a young woman comes of age in a dysfunctional Asian family whose members...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family
Author:Lindsay Wong
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:9781551527
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:320 pages pages

The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family Reviews

  • Laleh
    Feb 06, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

  • Alexis
    Feb 08, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

  • Vanessa
    Feb 20, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

  • Zoom
    May 12, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

  • Brandon
    Mar 14, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

  • George Ilsley
    Jan 30, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

  • Tina
    Jan 18, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

    Mostly, I?m just glad to be done reading this book. It felt extremely disconnected, which reading it does make sense that it would be that way. It also was only emotional in a weirdly reflective way? For such an emotional book with so many crazy things happening it just felt flat. ...

    Canada Reads has introduced me to some good books. This is not one of them. Canada Reads should promote books that further our understanding of minorities, immigrants, and other marginalized groups. This book for me created more stereotypes than it broke down. It is supposed to be a st...

    I don't read many memoirs by non famous people as I have the impression/worry that they are going to be either misery drenched or rags to riches gloating. However The Woo Woo is a delightful rebuttal to my prejudice. What makes this memoir so good is Lindsay Wong's writing, it is much ...

    This book is written with a dark, frequently cruel humor. This seems to be the authors way of handling memories of her neglectful and at times downright abusive upbringing. It couldn?t have been that bad if it?s funny right? Right?? This style of writing will likely be off putti...

  • Krista
    Jan 10, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

  • Louise
    Feb 16, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

  • Gail Amendt
    Mar 10, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

    Mostly, I?m just glad to be done reading this book. It felt extremely disconnected, which reading it does make sense that it would be that way. It also was only emotional in a weirdly reflective way? For such an emotional book with so many crazy things happening it just felt flat. ...

    Canada Reads has introduced me to some good books. This is not one of them. Canada Reads should promote books that further our understanding of minorities, immigrants, and other marginalized groups. This book for me created more stereotypes than it broke down. It is supposed to be a st...

  • ❀ Susan G
    Mar 10, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

  • MJ Beauchamp
    Feb 23, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

  • Sierra Gemma
    Nov 27, 2018

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

  • Susan
    Feb 15, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

  • Brooke
    Mar 10, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

  • Allison
    Mar 23, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

  • Pamela
    Feb 12, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

  • Duncan McCurdie
    Jan 24, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

    Mostly, I?m just glad to be done reading this book. It felt extremely disconnected, which reading it does make sense that it would be that way. It also was only emotional in a weirdly reflective way? For such an emotional book with so many crazy things happening it just felt flat. ...

    Canada Reads has introduced me to some good books. This is not one of them. Canada Reads should promote books that further our understanding of minorities, immigrants, and other marginalized groups. This book for me created more stereotypes than it broke down. It is supposed to be a st...

    I don't read many memoirs by non famous people as I have the impression/worry that they are going to be either misery drenched or rags to riches gloating. However The Woo Woo is a delightful rebuttal to my prejudice. What makes this memoir so good is Lindsay Wong's writing, it is much ...

  • Tracey Macleod
    Feb 07, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

  • Kathleen
    May 19, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

  • Joanne MacNevin
    Feb 12, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

  • Savannah
    Jan 29, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

    Mostly, I?m just glad to be done reading this book. It felt extremely disconnected, which reading it does make sense that it would be that way. It also was only emotional in a weirdly reflective way? For such an emotional book with so many crazy things happening it just felt flat. ...

  • Jessie
    Feb 09, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

  • Virginia Van
    Nov 03, 2018

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

  • Patti
    Apr 23, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

  • Eryn Prince
    Jan 01, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

    I struggled to finish The Woo Woo. I sure hope that some of the situations were embellished and have to wonder what her family thinks of their dysfunction not only being part of a novel but highlighted for Canada Reads. The book made me appreciate my old childhood experience even m...

    I'm not sure what inspired the author to write about her odious family but it is neither interesting nor entertaining. ...

    Painful. Just painful. ...

    This book was one of the five debated on CANADA READS 2019. It was the first one voted off and the only one that I had not read. I put it on hold at the library in February, but many others were ahead of me. I just finished reading it and agree with the order the books were voted off C...

    It must have taken Lindsay Wong a great amount of courage to write this story. It is not easy to talk about mental illness and to reveal yours and your family's demons- woo woos- to the entire world to judge. I found quite a few repeating passages and parts that could have been edited...

    Lindsay Wong has a smart and creative way with words. I am happy to see her memoir considered for Canada Reads 2019, it is funny and depressing in an uplifting kind of way, very bizarre. A somewhat unique voice, very well executed. Only real low point for me is that the "fun in dysfunc...

    This is a great memoir about growing up in a Chinese family with mental health issues. There's a lot of dark humour involved, and Lindsay Wong, the author, doesn't pull any punches and shows the dark side of what has happened in her family. However, as someone who suffers mental health...

    Funny in a sad way for the first few chapters but then just sad in a pathetic way. Makes me wonder how real vs exaggerated the story is. ...

    2.5 stars. The Woo-Woo is an unflinching, yet emotionally distant, memoir which chronicles the author?s experiences growing up in her dysfunctional Chinese-Canadian family. Wong?s childhood and young adulthood is filled with verbal/physical abuse and neglect, and she struggles w...

    I forced myself to finish reading this even though I hated it, just so I could write this review. This is a badly written memoir written by a miserable, rich, whiny, incredibly irritating Chinese girl in Vancouver whose family is all battling mental illness (which they refer to as ...

    3.5 ? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book 3.5 ?? This book reminded me of The Glass Castle and Educated. *CBC Canada Reads book ...more ...

    I can only hope that the Canada Reads panel provides me with insight about why this book is so extraordinary. I feel for Wong's emotionally-charged childhood, and the constant presence of mental illness in her family, but the writing is choppy, and there are way too many descriptors or...

    Abandoned at 30%. This memoir is a stark look at a dysfunctional family burdened by undiagnosed mental illness and immigrant stoicism, but I got tired of the repetitiveness. In every chapter the same incidents are repeated over and over: her dad calls her stupid, crying brings on dem...

    A touching and darkly humorous memoir about growing up in a Canadian Chinese family in "Hongcouver" which blames their psychiatric woes on ghosts and demons known as "the woo-woos, from her mother, who sees camping in a Walmart parking lot as the only safe haven to escape the spirits o...

    Some stories are stranger than fiction. This one is a story of resilience, and survival, and can be overwhelming to read. There is a lot to process here -- and this reading experience must be just a tiny glimmer of what the author experienced in her upbringing. ...

    Mostly, I?m just glad to be done reading this book. It felt extremely disconnected, which reading it does make sense that it would be that way. It also was only emotional in a weirdly reflective way? For such an emotional book with so many crazy things happening it just felt flat. ...

    Canada Reads has introduced me to some good books. This is not one of them. Canada Reads should promote books that further our understanding of minorities, immigrants, and other marginalized groups. This book for me created more stereotypes than it broke down. It is supposed to be a st...

    I don't read many memoirs by non famous people as I have the impression/worry that they are going to be either misery drenched or rags to riches gloating. However The Woo Woo is a delightful rebuttal to my prejudice. What makes this memoir so good is Lindsay Wong's writing, it is much ...

    This book is written with a dark, frequently cruel humor. This seems to be the authors way of handling memories of her neglectful and at times downright abusive upbringing. It couldn?t have been that bad if it?s funny right? Right?? This style of writing will likely be off putti...

    The most beautiful and heartbreaking nuances in this memoir come from the narrator?s unflinching honesty. I believe that some people take issue with the fact that the author dictates her experiences in a way that doesn?t always paint her as the heroine of her own story, but what...

  • Philip
    Feb 12, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

  • Elise  Buller
    Feb 24, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...

    Memoirs are hard to review. I feel weird and out of place reviewing and rating someones life. When I rate and review memoirs it is more about if I had a good time reading the book, did the story move me, the writing style...I try very hard not to judge the choices the authors make in m...

    I found this book difficult to read. The subject matter was difficult, and, as much as I don't like to say this about an autobiographical work of non-fiction, the characters were very unlikeable and therefore made for hard reading. There were a lot of sections in this book where I coul...

    Poorly written, mean, and vulgar. Also, although I'm sure there is a kernel of truth in this memoir, it reeked of exaggeration and hyperbole. I guess that's what was supposed to make it "witty"? It's a shame this book was selected for Canada Reads. ...

    As a fellow Asian Vancouverite who comes from a large and very close extended Asian family, I mildly enjoyed this memoir. The writing is crude, salty and brash, quite unlike any of the other books that are shortlisted for Canada Reads 2019; often I questioned if I was laughing beca...

    ((2.5)) I feel bad but I just didn?t really like this book. The first 100 pages I was pretty into it and enjoyed the authors writing and humorous way of recalling her childhood but after that it became a chore to get through. She had a great story to tell but I felt like it became ju...

  • Will
    Nov 11, 2018

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

  • ❤️
    Mar 09, 2019

    ?Between my mother?s hysterics and the uncertainty of my illness, I couldn?t help but believe that I had fallen into madness.? This book reads like an endless number of user-submitted stories to a February issue of Reader?s Digest. Wong does not give reason as to why she i...

    I started laughing. I couldn't stop giggling because I wasn't what my family termed Woo-Woo: I was only medically damaged ? the spirits that have plagued my Chinese family for years be damned. Thank God. I was a freak with terrible, mutinous genes, but at least I was not turning int...

    This is a great book about family, abuse, and mental health. It is a dark, dark, dark comedy. I think the subtitle (no doubt chosen by the publisher and not the author) makes the book seem like it is going to be more about hockey and drug raids than it is. I'm guessing the publisher wa...

    Lindsay Wong?s memoir, The Woo Woo, takes a look at growing up in a family plagued with mental illness. Equal parts heartbreaking and darkly comedic, The Woo Woo explores the author?s complicated relationship with her parents, siblings and extended family as well as her own mental ...

    3.5 stars. This is the first book on the 2019 Canada Reads shortlist that I've read so far, and I'll mostly be reviewing it under that lens. This year's theme is 'a book to move you' and I do think that it fits the theme well. The Woo-Woo is a moving memoir because it highlights ...