The Ungrateful Refugee

The Ungrateful Refugee

What is it like to be a refugee? It is a question many of us do not give much thought to, and yet there are more than 25 million refugees in the world. To be a refugee is to grapple with your place in society, attempting to reconcile the life you have known with a new, unfamiliar home. All this while bearing the burden of gratitude in your host nation: the expectation that What is it like to be a refugee? It is a question many of us do not give much thought to, and yet there are more than 25 ...

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Title:The Ungrateful Refugee
Author:Dina Nayeri
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:1786893452
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

The Ungrateful Refugee Reviews

  • Jodi
    Oct 05, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

  • Dina
    Mar 02, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

  • Bookworm
    Sep 04, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

  • Karen
    Aug 18, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

  • Lisa
    May 16, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

  • Elyse Walters
    Sep 19, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

  • Hannah
    Jul 22, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

  • Mehrsa
    Oct 06, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

  • Annie
    Aug 15, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

  • Sharyn L.
    Sep 13, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

    Dina Nayeri tells the story of her own experience as a refugee intermixed with other refugee stories and points out all of the ways society expects them to act. Nayeri offers a lot of important insight into in this book, but for me, it was a bit slow at times. It felt repetitive, maybe...

    This memoir challenges the stereotypical image of refugees. I think this book offers important insight which we all need to hear in these challenging political times. ...

  • Jenna
    Jun 15, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

  • Tracey
    Sep 29, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

  • Rhonda Lomazow
    May 19, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

  • Diane S ☔
    Sep 25, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

  • Cathy
    Sep 18, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

    Dina Nayeri tells the story of her own experience as a refugee intermixed with other refugee stories and points out all of the ways society expects them to act. Nayeri offers a lot of important insight into in this book, but for me, it was a bit slow at times. It felt repetitive, maybe...

  • Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)
    Aug 28, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

  • Paltia
    Oct 03, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

  • Hong
    Sep 10, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

  • Janelle
    Sep 23, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

  • Barbara
    Jul 17, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

  • Catapult
    Feb 04, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

  • Emily Nichols
    Oct 04, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

  • Senshin
    Sep 10, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

  • Nancy Lambert
    Sep 09, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

    Dina Nayeri tells the story of her own experience as a refugee intermixed with other refugee stories and points out all of the ways society expects them to act. Nayeri offers a lot of important insight into in this book, but for me, it was a bit slow at times. It felt repetitive, maybe...

    This memoir challenges the stereotypical image of refugees. I think this book offers important insight which we all need to hear in these challenging political times. ...

    Robin Mower alerted me to this. ...

  • Marissa Kasang
    Jul 16, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

  • Ann D’Aleandro
    Jun 09, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

  • Stephanie Harnden
    Sep 10, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

  • Nat | noushareads
    Oct 06, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

    Dina Nayeri tells the story of her own experience as a refugee intermixed with other refugee stories and points out all of the ways society expects them to act. Nayeri offers a lot of important insight into in this book, but for me, it was a bit slow at times. It felt repetitive, maybe...

    This memoir challenges the stereotypical image of refugees. I think this book offers important insight which we all need to hear in these challenging political times. ...

    Robin Mower alerted me to this. ...

    Part memoir, part reconstruction, this non-fiction book written by author Dina Nayeri serves as a compassionate and unforgettable reminder that refugees are more than a statistic and number. Dina brings in her own personal experiences of having to leave her homeland of Iran at the age...

    Nayeri's memoir was difficult reading for me, still extremely powerful -- exactly as life lessons can be. . Right in the first pages of the book, she points out that we can consume her book as entertainment, or education, or threats; for it is our choice of how to hear the stories pr...

  • Anne Cornford
    Aug 16, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

  • Sy
    Jun 16, 2019

    Holy moly... wow wow wow!!!! WORTH READING... WORTH DISCUSSIONS ... but I?m not exactly on the same page with Dina on everything. I listened to this book from the wonders of Hoopla... ...reminded by just how far technology has come... in supporting instant availability in re...

    Dina was right years old when she, her brother and mother fled Iran. As a Christian convert, her mother was spreading pamphlets around the country, an act that brought death threats from the morality authorities. They became refugees. Told in alternating chapters, Dina chronicles he...

    "You never forget the moment you were part of a shivering horde, when another human threw you your food, when you slept in mud alongside your confused children, when you shoved and grunted beside other faceless people, some of them former architects, doctors, teachers. It can break yo...

    I'm very torn on what rating to give this book. On the one hand, some parts of it are so beautifully written that it should be praised to the rooftops. On the other, it rambles about and loses its sense of direction far more often than I liked. I found the concept of the 'ungratefu...

    "you have to understand, / no one puts their children in a boat / unless the water is safer than the land." -Warsan Shire, "Home" THE UNGRATEFUL REFUGEE is a clarion call for human dignity, especially for those who have been forced from their home countries. Nayeri details her exper...

    In her first work of nonfiction, winner of the 2018 UNESCO City of Literature Paul Engle Prize Dina Nayeri?an author whose ?exploration of the exile?s predicament is tender and urgent? (The New Yorker)?examines what it means to be a refugee through her own story of childhood ...

    This was a book that really grappled with the refugee and asylum seeker experience, from someone who has lived this experience first hand and has worked with those in the process. There is lots to unpack in what this book covers, and I think for that reason this would be a wonderful ch...

    When she was eight years old, Dina Nayeri?s mother began to be harassed by members of Iran?s Revolutionary Guard and morality police. It wasn?t long before thing got so bad that she packed up her two children and fled Isfahan. The Ungrateful Refugee is a blend of memoir and nonfi...

    I don?t usually write reviews but this phenomenally defiant book is just a thing of beauty. A must-read, regardless of who you are or what you care about. ...

    I wish that everyone, but especially everyone from my home country and any other northern European countries, would read this book. It opens your eyes and your heart, makes you rethink what you think you know about refugees, and it is beautifully written! ...

    Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I know it took me a while to finish it but the subject matter could be hard to read at times. I love Nayeri?s style of writing. I enjoyed learning more about this author. I learned a lot about what all refugees go through. ...

    An electrifying essential read. Nayeri describes the West as ?as a mother who once adopted us, the exiles and outcasts, and now needs us to intervene as calluses harden fast around her heart.? This is her story as well as the story of the many. She sets out to volunteer on Lesbos a...

    Nayeri?s candid work about her own and other refugees? experiences is eye opening and inspiring as she gives voice to those who have none. She describes her family?s journey from Iran, to Europe and to the US as well as the deeply psychic journey for those seeking refuge or asylu...

    I'm deeply inspired by this book and it has been such an eye opening to me: to make something happen while in waiting period. Being a refugee means leaving behind the old life and embarking to an unknown path to the future filled with uncertainties and waiting period. If you are cu...

    The title got my interest especially as I know a little bit of the author's backstory and had read other works by her. I was intrigued to read what she had to say, especially in light of the ongoing conversation of refugees seeking a better life, safety and hope for the future. The ...

    This book was an interesting look into the minds of refugees at various places in the refugee process. It?s hard to comprehend what these people go through. I can?t imagine anyone finishing this book and not feeling empowered to be more kind to those around them. ...

    This was really good at showing many aspects of refugee life, with a focus on the things refugees aren't "supposed to" admit to publicly. I particularly liked the parallels between what the author had learned at a writer's workshop about how to craft a story and what the refugees she m...

    A very challenging read, pushing me to more understanding of what it is to run, leaving everything behind, and to then have to convince others that you are a "genuine refugee" ...

    Dina Nayeri has written an open raw book a book that reveals what itbis like to be a refugee.She shares with us her life as a refugee from Iran and the experiences of refugees from other countries.In today?s climate this is an enlightening real look at what it takes to escape your co...

    Interesting blend of memoir, narrative, and rhetoric, this takes a hard look at the experience of refugees and the mythology around immigration. There are a lot of tools in Nayeri's toolbox here, and she makes use of them well. ...

    I LOVED Dina Nayeri's novel, Refugee, and I bought a copy for everyone I know. It was just so beautiful. This is sort of a memoir, but it's really not. If it had been a polemic, a memoir, or an analysis of the refugee experience, I think it would have been a clearer a story. The book i...

    An excellent book that details the author's own experience as a refugee from Iran, as well as a handful of other refugees. I think this provides a necessary and powerful perspective on immigration as a whole and why refugees may be bitter toward their host country, even while it afford...

    Dina Nayeri lays out her own story along several others; she explains what life looks like for a variety of refugees. The stages they go through - escape, waiting, asylum, assimilation - all get attention and reflections. Nayeri, an Iranian who fled with her Christian mother and brothe...

    The author, a refugee herself when she was a child, tells about her experiences and those of other refugees she met as an adult. The most interesting part of the book was her explanations of the difficulty refugees have in describing their situations because of the differences in cultu...

    Parts of this were really great, and some the refugee stories were amazing, but overall it's really scattered and hard to follow. ...

    Dina Nayeri tells the story of her own experience as a refugee intermixed with other refugee stories and points out all of the ways society expects them to act. Nayeri offers a lot of important insight into in this book, but for me, it was a bit slow at times. It felt repetitive, maybe...

    This memoir challenges the stereotypical image of refugees. I think this book offers important insight which we all need to hear in these challenging political times. ...

    Robin Mower alerted me to this. ...

    Part memoir, part reconstruction, this non-fiction book written by author Dina Nayeri serves as a compassionate and unforgettable reminder that refugees are more than a statistic and number. Dina brings in her own personal experiences of having to leave her homeland of Iran at the age...